HEALTH
INFORMATION

How can the Whisper Mill Help me if...
I am healthy or I have...

Aggression and
Delinquency
Myalgic Encephalomyelitis 
Alzheimer's Disorder Epilepsy
Arthritis Gallstones
Asthma Infertility
Bad Breath Joint Problems
Bowel Cancer Leukemia
Cancer Liver Disorders
Circulation Problems Diverticulitis
Cirrhosis Multiple Sclerosis
Coeliac Disorder Muscular Dystrophy
Constipation Thyroid Disorders
Depression Varicose Veins
Diabetes Nutrition
 Nutrition Protein Content


A Healthy Human Diet

 In general, people obtain their food energy from carbohydrates (about 60%), lesser amounts come from
fat (about 20%) and protein (about 15%), derived mainly from fish.

Cereal grains provide about 70% of the food energy consumed by humans. The most widely used cereals are rice, wheat, and corn; these are followed by millets, sorghum, oats and barley. Almost every human society regards one of these foods as its principle staple.

Legumes such as lentils, peas, beans and peanuts also from an important part of the diet. These legumes are nutritionally important because most of them contain considerably more protein than most cereal or root crops do.

The ration of amino acids found in legume protein also often complements the ratio present in the staple food. The combination of a cereal grain and a legume in the traditional diets of many different cultural groups is therefore sound nutritional practice.

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 Protein Content

Carbohydrate content of cereals ranges from 60% to 80%

Lipid content 2% to 7%

Barley: 8% to 21%

Corn: 8% to 17%

Rye 8% to 10%

Wheat 8% to 22%

The extent and method of processing drastically alter the relation between the vitamin, mineral, and lipid value.

Most grains are commercially milled to separate the floury endosperms from the bran and germ oil, which can cause rancidity if not used shortly after milling. The germ is highly nutritious however, and may be added to food products after being dried and rolled.

Flour is used in various types of baked and cereal products,
in pasta products, and in gravies.

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Aggression and Delinquency
Whole grain foods and vegetables should be eaten.
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 Alzheimer's Disease
 Soya beans fight alzheimer's disease. They are rich in the coenzyme Q10 as well as being a source of fibre, protein and carbohydrates.
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Arthritis
 Eat plenty of wholegrain cereals, soybeans and tofu because a healthy diet boosts the immune system and provides sufferers with extra energy to fight the disorder.
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 Asthma
 Foods rich in vitamin B such as pulses can be beneficial.
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 Bad Breath
Wholegrain cereals and water should be consumed to avoid constipation, which can lead to bad breath.
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Bowel Cancer

Bran may reduce risk of bowel cancer. The more fibre contained in the diet, the lower the incidence of bowel cancer.

Rice bran may also reduce the risk of bowel cancer.


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 Cancer

High fibre foods are vital for protection against cancer of the colon, rectum, prostate, uterus and breast.

Soya beans and products can protect against cancer, particularly breast cancer due to plant hormones called phytoestrogens.

Pulses (beans, peas, etc) contain insoluble and soluble fibre and promotes regular bowel movements which can help and lessen the risk of cancers of the colon and rectum.


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Circulation Problems
Eat plenty of wholegrain cereals, bread and pasta, because a healthy diet can significantly reduce the risk of circulation problems.
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Cirrhosis
Eat complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, wholegrain bread and pasta. A sensible high carbohydrate diet can at least help to prevent further deterioration.
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Coeliac Disorder
Sufferers should consume pulses, rice, corn and nuts, and they should use maize, cornflower, rice flour and soya flour instead of gluten products.
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Constipation

Bran can help prevent constipation, piles and diverticulitis.

Pulses contain insoluble and soluble fibre and help guard against constipation.

Wholegrain cereals and bread provide insoluble fibre and help constipation.


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Depression
Eat wholegrains, peas, lentils and other types of pulse. They supply B vitamins, iron, potassium, magnesium, copper and zinc which assist depression sufferers.
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Diabetes

Pulses have a good source of protein and fibre, they help control blood sugar levels and can be useful to diabetics.

Rice helps steady blood sugar levels.

Starchy, high fibre foods such as wholegrain bread, brown rice, cereals, beans, peas and lentils.


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Diverticulitis
Wholemeal bread, porridge and brown rice are high in fibre which help people with diverticulitis, constipation and hemorrhoids.
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Epilepsy
Epilepsy sufferers should eat pulses such as peas and beans, wholemeal flour, millet, wheat grem and lentils to supply zinc, magnesium and vitamin B.Rice and wholemeal bread provide manganese. All these products have been found to help to prevent convulsions in some people.
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Gallstones
A high intake of soluble fibre, which can help to reduce blood cholesterol therefore helps prevent the development of gallstones. Oat bran and pulses are a good source of soluble fibre.
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Infertility

Foods rich in manganese (oats, wheat germ, rye bread and peas) promote the action of oestrogen, and vitamin B's (wholegrains such as brown rice, wheat germ, pulses oats and green vegetables), which is also involved in oestrogen metabolism.

Soya beans and wholemeal bread will provide magnesium.


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Joint Problems
Scientific evidence suggests that diets that are low in selenium can cause joint problems. Wholegrains, shellfish, cereals and eggs provide good amounts of selenium.
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Leukemia
B vitamins found in wheat germ, wholegrains, brown rice and pulses can help supply energy needed.
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Liver Disorders
Wholegrain cereals and green vegetables will provide foliate which are depleted in the course of liver disease.
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Myalgic Encephalomyelitis
Eat plenty of wholegrains and pasta for complex carbohydrates, and wholegrain cereals and pulses for B vitamins.
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Multiple Sclerosis
Patients can benefit from wholegrains for energy, and can get polyunsaturated fats from corn and soya oils.
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Muscular Dystrophy
Essential fibre can be provided from foods such as wholemeal bread, brown rice and vegetables. Fibre encourages regular bowel habits which relieves constipation associated with the disease.
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Thyroid Disorders
An adequate intake of B vitamins, found in wholegrains and pulses, is essential for the metabolism of the extra carbohydrates and protein.
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Varicose Veins
Fibre rich foods such as wholemeal bread, brown rice, bran, fresh fruit and vegetables which prevent constipation, appear to reduce the risk of varicose veins.
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